Jones v. Opelika: Fee for Distributing Literature is Unconstitutional

Jones v. Opelika: Fee for Distributing Literature is Unconstitutional

Jones v. Opelika II

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Decided: Jones v. Opelika II — The U.S. Supreme Court will rule the practice of charging a flat fee for people distributing literature is unconstitutional. The freedom of press is not to be restricted only to those who can afford to pay the licensing fee.

Justice William O. Douglas writes in the majority opinion:

"The mere fact that the religious literature is 'sold' by itinerant preachers rather than 'donated' does not transform evangelism into a commercial enterprise. If it did, then the passing of the collection plate in church would make the church service a commercial project."

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