First Confessing Church Synod Meets in Wuppertal-Barmen Hot

First Confessing Church Synod Meets in Wuppertal-Barmen

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The first "Confessing Church" synod meets in Wuppertal-Barmen over the next three days.

At the end of the synod, they issue their famous Barmen Declaration, written primarily by Karl Barth, which states:

"We reject the false doctrine, as though the church could and would have to acknowledge as a source of its proclamation, apart from and besides this one Word of God, still other events and powers, figures and truths, as God's revelation."

This denies the common German Christian belief that God's revelation works through race and nation rather than just through scripture. In effect, it declares the Nazi-supported Reichskirche to be heretical. It also states:

"We reject the false doctrine, as though there were areas of our life in which we would not belong to Jesus Christ, but to other lords — areas in which we would not need justification and sanctification through him."

This is a meant rejection of some, but not all, Nazi ideology. It rejects the principle that Nazism must be the leading principle in every area of a person's life, but it says nothing at all about most of the rest of what the Nazis promote — including their racism, anti-Semitism, or their attacks on Jews.

Ultimately, there is no substantive resistance to be found among members of the Confessing Church.

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