'Malicious Practices Act' Enacted to Protect Germany From Treason Hot

In response to criticisms that the German legal system isn't moving quickly or harshly enough against opponents of the government, State Secretary Franz Schlegelberger declares that the Reich Ministry of Justice and all parts of the legal system will support any measures designed to protect the German state and the German community from acts of "treason and high treason."

The same day, Schelgelberger presents to the cabinet the Decree of the Reich President for the "Protection against Treacherous Attacks on the Government of the Nationalist Movement," commonly referred to as the "Malicious Practices Act." Quickly passed into law, this decree imposes a prison sentence on anyone who makes:

"a statement of a factual nature which is untrue or grossly exaggerated" and which damages the welfare or reputation of the government, the Nazi Party, or related organizations."

People are encouraged to inform on one another about accusations of disloyalty, dissent, and other political crimes. The wave of denunciations is so great that even the police have to conclude that the act is questionable.

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