Honorius and Theodosius II Issue Law Against Christian Heretic Anomeans

Honorius and Theodosius II Issue Law Against Christian Heretic Anomeans

Roman Emperor Theodosius II
Source: Marie-Lan Nguyen

Roman emperors Honorius and Theodosius II issue a new law against the Christian heretics known as the Anomeans (Also known as Eunomians after one of their leaders, Eunomius of Cyzicus).

Anomoeanism is an Arian sect which teaches that Jesus had a completely different nature from God. The label Anomoean comes from the Greek for "not similar".

This Roman law or edict states:

"We decree that those provisions which were formerly established by the law of our sainted father of our Clemency against the Eunomians shall remain in force and that hereafter they shall not give anything to each other or obtain anything from each other by gift; likewise, they shall neither bequeath nor take anything by testament.

They shall forfeit the emoluments which they customarily obtained from gifts or from the wills of decedents by mutual allurements through fraud and circumvention. thus they shall be totally deprived of participation in both such rights.

In case of intestacy, ... if none of those persons [in the ancient laws for the right of succession] survive who might be legally called to an inheritance, then the goods of the decedent who died in the aforesaid superstition shall be confiscated. Moreover, prohibited gifts made in the aforesaid manner shall be confiscated." [CTh 16.5.49]

These were not the first laws against the Anomeans. Emperor Arcadius had issues similar restrictions against the Anomeans in 395, but then retracted them in 399.

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