Ingraham v. Wright: Court Rules Corporal Punishment in Schools Not Unconstitutional Hot

Ingraham v. Wright: Court Rules Corporal Punishment in Schools Not Unconstitutional

Ingraham v. Wright

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Decided: Ingraham v. Wright — The U.S. Supreme Court rules that corporal punishment in the schools is not unconstitutional. In this case, 14-year-old James Ingraham was held down on a table with Lemmie Deliford, the assistant principal, restraining Ingraham's arms and Solomon Barnes, an assistant to the principal, restraining Ingraham's legs.

Principal Willie J. Wright, Jr. then proceeded to beat Ingraham so severely that he suffered a hematoma and required medical attention. According to the Supreme Court, none of this rose to the level of "cruel and unusual punishment" or loss of liberty.

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